Inside the Mind of Isadora

Friday Fictioneers – Spikey Audrey

48 Comments

The artist stood back as he eyed his creation. Not too bad, he thought.

It does need something to enhance the color. White spikey thorns flowed from the paintbrush. Perfect.

Roger completed ten paintings for the gallery opening in one week, with Spikey Audrey being his last. 

The crowds eyed his paintings with philosophical implications. Customers whispered as sold stickers indicated sales.

Roger heard a voice behind him, “It looks like you’ve betrayed your philosophies.”

“Mercy me if it isn’t cynical, Mona.”

“Sorry, darling, I expected more than flowers from you.”

“It’s all business, not art, my dear, just business.”

2022©Isadora De La Vega

Genre: Flash Fiction

Word Count: 100

Photo Prompt:©Trish Nankeville

~~~~~~~~~

Rochelle @ Addicted to Purple hosts Friday Fictioneers 

 to join in click here

Author: Inside the Mind of Isadora

Intriguing, sensitive, mysterious, loving, artistic and crackling with excitement for life is a pretty good description of who I am. I just retired from the world of art where I sold my Artfully Designed Handmade Jewelry for 28 years; although, art will always be a part of who I am no matter what venue I choose to express it in.

48 thoughts on “Friday Fictioneers – Spikey Audrey

  1. He has to do whatever he needs to earn a living. Great take on the prompt, Isadora.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I expect every hungry artist must eat and pay the bills.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Produce them fast and sell Walmart style. Cheap and lots of them. That way you don’t have to wait to know whether you are a “great” artist. Need money today, not left to posterity.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh my, Oneta. Wlam-mart is the curse of death. There are other ways to sell art without buying into Chinese copies of american art or anything else.
      Yes, a salary is important but there are wonderful places that appreciate creative art such as galleries and one-man exhibits. You are right, most artists are recognized after their death … if they are good. A very controvertial topic, for sure. Thank you for commenting and visiting.
      Isadora 😎

      Like

      • I am guilty of a bit of over-speak. Sort of tongue in check to show the extremes. Do you want to make money or do you want to be famous. Most fame does not come during one’s life. Maybe I should change that to “much” rather than most. You might decide to put a picture on an easel at an art fair or even a state fair. That would be “fame” for me! But probably it would not buy my bread and butter. 😀

        Liked by 1 person

        • You didn’t over-speak, Oneta. I enjoy the honest repartee of comments. I agree that that’s the extreme of business. I had an artist friend who was very popular when he was alive. He was a wildlife artist. Since his passing his wife hasn’t been able to sell his paintings. I think it depends on the inner circle thing. Most of the artists in Spain, such as Picasso, Dali and Gaude were in the same circle. Perhaps, that’s what made them famous after their passing. It’s a fickle world, the world of art. Thanks for your honest dialogue on art. Have a peaceful Wednesday.Thanks, Isadora 😎

          Liked by 1 person

          • Sweet reply. I am a realist. I see lots of pictures I would love to live with. Or I can go to the store and dream as I look. I do love the great art, barring Picasso.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Thanks for the morning chuckle, Oneta. Picasso did have an odd eye. I’ve collected art throughout my art career, by way of purchases or bartering. Now, after just turning 75, I’m at the stage of downsizing. My collection is large. It will be quite a job. No … my children do not want them. LOL
              You are a delight. Thanks for your support. ❤️😎

              Liked by 1 person

  4. Art is necessary after all the bills have been paid. I hope he can see that in the long run

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I wonder if Spiky Audrey was a visitor to a previous exhibit 🤔

    Liked by 1 person

  6. There’s a time to be artistic, and a time to be practical…

    Liked by 1 person

  7. who can blame him? one has to earn a living. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I’m not sure what all is going on here but it feels petty-minded and ill-spirited for the occasion. I’m sorry the artist is getting harassed and I’m sorry the artist may also have “sold out” his talent for the sake of money.

    Like

  9. Hmm. Me thinks “I expected more than flowers from you” was enough of a dig to trigger the business response. But the art is what it is. Some of us are quite proud of our work, but when it’s done we willing share with the highest bidder.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, a definite stabbing comeback from Roger to Mona. Art created for selling has to conform to what the public wants as art unless you don’t want an income. Since art is subjective, you can never please everyone. The starving artist does exist, unless you conform.
      Can you tell I was an artist for 28 years?
      I saw a documentary on Andy Warhol that addresses the way the public views art. The traveling Van Gogh exhibit, I recently attended, talked about his depressed feelings about how the public perceived his art work. Even the greats lack confidence in what they’re creating if it isn’t purchased. Have a good weekend … Isadora 😎

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I love the name Spikey Audrey :). Perfect!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. The compromises we have to make for capitalism unfortunately. At least he still gets to do something he enjoys.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Art for business’s sake! Well, he has to make a living.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Spikey Audrey is very photogenic.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I think you’ve nailed the art market trend for today Isadora

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I love ‘Spikey Audrey’ – good story.
    If his artworks are as stunningly brilliant as the flower in this photo, then he’s not betraying anything.

    Liked by 2 people

    • As a retired artist, I can say he’s probably happy just to be exhibiting in a gallery. His sales are icing on the cake. He does have to make a living plus he’s doing what he loves. I thought the flowers were very pretty too. Thanks for commenting, Trish. Have a good weekend … Isadora 😎

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Querida Isadora,

    Que triste. Business…just business. There’s a painter who really isn’t interested in art. Bien escrito mi amiga.

    Shalom y abrazos,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 2 people

    • Querida Rochelle,
      You know I’ve been in the game for a long time. I’ve seen all of the spectrums of the art world. One can’t sell art unless you love to do it. Your soul, your heart and your entire being is in there, but when the stomach starts to growl there has to be money to buy the food. Now, if we all had inheritances or old money, then we could do what we like instead of what we have to do. Anyway, not a problem for me since I dislike eating and Al can pay for the house. LOL Silly me … Actually, I have stomach issues due to Anna and bulimia. Aye, la vida es tan fuerte. Gracias, mi amiga
      Abrazos y Carino,
      Isadora 😎

      Like

  17. Mona’s criticism seems fair

    Liked by 2 people

    • Yes and no, on Mona. She may be a bit jealous of his sales or does not want to fall into the game of capitalism. I like Mona though becasue she says it like she wants to. Hey, Neil, thanks for stopping by and commenting. Have a good weekend … Isadora 😎

      Like

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