Inside the Mind of Isadora

Friday Fictioneers – Foolish Games

54 Comments

“Quiet she’s walking this way,” Patricia whispered. 

Francesca approached cautiously. 

They huddled together excluding her.

Shelia chastised Patricia’s meanness. “Invite her!”

~~~~~

“Hey, Francesca, want to come to my party?”, Patricia asked, while handing her a paper.

An invite? She couldn’t believe it.

“Sure,” she said. “I’ll ask my Mom”.

~~~~~

“Please, Mom”. “Patricia is the popular girl.”

“Fine, one hour only.”

~~~~~

The instructions read: ‘Go 2 blocks passed the deli on Elm Street.’ Desperate, Francesca asked a passing older woman.

“No dear, there’s no Cherry Lane around here”.

A heavy rain began to fall, the perfect cover for a fools tears.

2019©Isadora DeLaVega

~~~~~

 

Genre: Flash Fiction
Word Count: 100
Photo Prompt: J.Hardy Carroll

To join Rochelle and her Friday Fictioneers challenge

click here

~~~~~

***** Bullying is the use of force, threat, exclusion or coercion to abuse, or intimidate aggressively toward others. The behavior is often repeated and habitual in an event to overpower another.

***** Although I attended a Catholic parochial school which should have made bullying null and void, it did not. As the only Latino child in an all anglo school, my ethnic difference provided a great deal for students to use against me. Bullying comes in many colors and ethnic backgrounds; perhaps, one day it will be erradicated.

 

 

Author: Inside the Mind of Isadora

Intriguing, sensitive, mysterious, loving, artistic and crackling with excitement for life is a pretty good description of who I am. I just retired from the world of art where I sold my Artfully Designed Handmade Jewelry for 28 years; although, art will always be a part of whom I am no matter what venue I choose to express it.

54 thoughts on “Friday Fictioneers – Foolish Games

  1. Oh my…how heartbreaking!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Same for me Issy, no child should suffer like it.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. A cruel trick and a sad tale. One hopes when they are a little older Patricia will realise just how evil what she did was.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. That Patricia is a little Satan. I’m sure she was laughing all the way to her manicure (to get her nails sharpened).

    Liked by 1 person

    • ~~~ : – ) … I always enjoy your humor Russell. Sharpening her nails – for sure.
      Kids can be so cruel. There has to be something in them that makes them
      feel it’s ok to do what they do to someone innocent. Thank for the smiles.
      Isadora 😎

      Like

  5. So very cruel… it’s better not to be invited at all.. this was pure torture.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, but the bullying person finds these types of things to be fun. That’s what so evil about them. This story happened to the only other student who was different too. He was from Trinidad. His father in the military which landed them in the states. We bonded because we were different. But, my look, curly, curly hair and brown skin color was their point of contention with me. I do remember standing alone everyday at recess watching them all play. I believe I’m stronger because of it but the memories are still there. Thanks for visiting and commenting, Bjorn. I always appreciate it.
      Isadora 😎

      Like

  6. I’m so sorry for the bullying you endured, Izzy. Your story is so very well written. It made me teary for poor Francesca.

    Liked by 1 person

    • This incident happened to a boy and was retold to me. He was the only other
      child in the school who was different like me. He was from Trinidad.
      Francesca was his replacement. Thank you for reading, Brenda and leaving
      your lovely comment.
      Isadora 😎

      Like

  7. A good story based on reality, Isadora. I was a little concerned my children having a father from India would face bullying but they didn’t. It’s terrible when that happens. There’s never any excuse for it. My son was teased when he was a preteen because he was small but it stopped when he got muscles. My daughter was outspoken and would have probably told them what she thought of that kind of treatment. She was anything but timid. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Bullying is the worst form of torture, especially and more so when it is subtle. A great story.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Wow that’s very powerful Isadora. Some people, bullies cannot see the harm they do and all for what, some kind of warped pleasure

    Like

    • Yes, indeed, Michael. These bullies have inscurites they cover up by acting bold and controlling. They disrespect anyone who is different from them. They are hateful and mean spirited. I hope one day this changes. Thanks for visiting and commenting. Isadora 😎

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Ah, that was very sad. And cruel. Why do people treat others like this?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, it’s sad indeed. I believe that bullies are hiding their own forms of insecurity. Perhaps, the devices kids seem to be obsessed with are an indication of their trying to avoid rejection or bullying. It’s terrible that it’s still happening today.
      Thanks for reading and commenting, Shirley. I alwasy appreciate it.
      Isadora 😎

      Like

  11. What a little bitch. Sorry. This type of bullying is the quiet kind, no less painful.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, I agree, Dale. It’s those sneaky quiet jabs that are the most painful. This type of bullying is the most cowardly.
      I was stirred and saddened when I was told this story. This happened to the only other student in my school who was different like me. I went to a very small school. 14 kids in my class all through grade school. He was from Trinidad. His father in the military which landed them in the states. We bonded because we were different. But, my look, curly, curly hair, quite skinny and brown skin color was their point of contention with me. I do remember standing alone everyday watching them all play. I believe I’m stronger because of it but the memories are still there. Thanks for your comment. I always appreciate your visiting.
      Isadora 😎

      Like

  12. Querida Isadora,

    Su cuuenta me hace triste en mi corazón. I’m so sorry this happened to you, mi amiga. Well written story that made my blood boil Sending you hugs.

    Shalom y cariño,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    • Querida Rochelle,
      Gracias por su abrazo y carino. El cuento es muy triste.
      I was stirred and sadden when I was told this story. This happened to the only other student in my school who was different like me. I went to a very small school. 14 kids in my class all through grade school.
      He was from Trinidad. His father in the military which landed them in the states. We bonded because we were different. But, my look, curly, curly hair, boney skinny and brown skin color was their point of contention with me. I do remember standing alone everyday watching them all play. I believe I’m stronger because of it but the memories are still there. I always appreciate your visiting.
      Que pases una a buena semana
      Besos y Shalom
      Isadora 😎

      Like

  13. Oh, this broke my heart. Well written. I, too, went to a Catholic school 1 – 12 grades, and was bullied because my hair was cut short ~ by my dad, I wore thick glasses and my mom bought our clothes at Goodwill. Thank goodness I grew out of it and think I’m pretty o.k. now. Glad to see you back, Izzie!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for the warm welcome back, Lish. I’m venturing out again in the writing waters. ~~~ : )
      Catholic schools are an entity all of their own. This story was about a boy who’d been bullied. He told me about it. He was the only dark skinned boy from the Dominican Republic in the school. We were two lost souls in a pool of people who didn’t understand the differences in people. I hope he rose above all of the hate and isolation. I know I did. It made me a stronger person. I knew I was more than what others thought of me. I’m so pleased you thought it was well-written. It helps my confidence for future FF writes. Hugs 😍
      Izzy 😎

      Like

  14. I know it’s fiction, but it’s also tragically true. I hate bullying. Your story stirred strong emotion in me, which means you did an excellent job.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks so much, Linda, for visiting and commenting. I was stirred and saddened when I was told this story. This happened to the only other student in my school who was different like me. I went to a very small school. 14 kids in my class. He was from Trinidad. His father in the military which landed them in the states. We bonded because we were different. But, my look, curly, curly hair and brown skin color was their point of contention with me. I do remember standing alone everyday watching them all play. I believe I’m stronger because of it but the memories are still there. I always appreciate your visiting.
      Isadora 😎

      Liked by 1 person

  15. The cruelty of kids …. horrible! … Hi Isadora!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Kids can be so cruel. Hopefully, horrible experiences such as this will make her determined to rise above the rest in later life.

    My story – ‘A stab in the dark’

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Children can be really cruel. Great lesson for Francesca, perhaps she will steer her own course in life.

    Liked by 1 person

    • This story happened to the only other student who was different at my school. He was from Trinidad. His father in the military which landed them in the states. We bonded because we were different. But, my look, curly, curly hair and brown skin color was their point of contention with me. I do remember standing alone everyday watching them all play. I believe I’m stronger because of it but the memories are still there. Bullying is still prevalent today. Thanks for commenting, James. I always appreciate your visiting.
      Isadora 😎

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Poor little girl. Such a sad but believable story. Well done.

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

    Like

    • Thank you for visiting and commenting, Susan. This story happened to the only other student who was different from the other students too. He was from Trinidad. His father was in the military which landed them in the states. We bonded because we were different. But, my look, curly, curly hair and darker skin color was their point of contention with me. I do remember standing alone everyday watching them all play. I believe I’m stronger because of it but the memories are still there. I always appreciate your visiting.
      Isadora 😎

      Like

  19. Popular girls like Patricia can be cruel. Why did they have to invite Francesca and give her a wrong address?

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Bullying and exclusion can take many forms. All of them hurt. My heart goes out to this young girl, who will never forget that day 😦

    Liked by 1 person

  21. I’m sorry you had to face bullying. Hopefully it will die out some day.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. I am sorry you had experienced bullying and I join you in hoping that we can one day eradicate this cruelty. I do believe, however, that children learn much of that cruelty from observing the adults around them — directly and indirectly — in what the adults do as well as what they don’t do (i.e. allow to take place). The mean words. The sneaky hierarchies. The “mean girls” and “mean boys” mentalities. The ‘hazing’ and the cruel jokes that one is supposed to grin and bear or be blamed as someone who ‘cannot take a joke.’ … Not only how they treat children (which can often be cruel in small and not small ways) but also how the treat other adults, especially those they label ‘others’, but also the every day small interactions and minor aggressions that teach children that power at any cost is acceptable, even admirable.
    We have much to do as adults, to become better role models to children, before we can truly eradicate bullying. For what I also believe is that most children, like most adults, have a great capacity for compassion and empathy. We can help them – and us – see it and use it and live it.
    And choose better leaders than the one who bully, besides.
    Good piece, that, Isadora!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I, too, feel adults should set an example to their children. Unfortunately, many parents are overwhelmed by the amount of things they have to do in their day that kids are now at the bottom of the list. They plop a device in their hands even at the youngest ages to keep them occupied while they run around chasing their tails to do all they can to keep up. Family dinners with my children were at the top of the list everyday. I was a stay-at-home mom until they were all in school. Then, I’d make myself seen everyday on committees to make sure I had my finger on what was happening. Today, the devices are the parents sitters. Kids have lost their ability to communicate. Perhaps, they feel safer from isolation because of their devices. Not seeing someone in the eye erases their fear of rejection.
      This story happened to the only other student who was different too. He was from Trinidad. His father was in the military which landed them in the states. We bonded because we were different. But, my look, curly, curly hair and darker skin color was their point of contention with me. I do remember standing alone everyday watching them all play. I believe I’m stronger because of it but the memories are still there. Thanks for the dialog, Na’ama. I always appreciate your visiting.
      Isadora 😎

      Liked by 1 person

      • These are all valid points, for all too many children, Isadora.
        Fortunately I also know many parents who are fighting against letting screens take over … and who make a point to NOT use screens themselves all the time … and who don’t give a child a screen in the first few years of life (which is getting harder and harder to do, but it is possible, at least to limit and minimize–I’m thinking, screens have their place on airplanes and doctors waiting rooms … not much else …).
        And … it does lead to lesser REAL social interactions – between children, between children and adults, among adults, too. It is not the same to ’email’ the teacher as to actually make the time to meet. Now, granted, it can be helpful to email and text for some things (change of appointment time, brief request) but it should not replace actual interaction. And all too often it does. And not for the better of the child.
        Here’s to more awareness and better socialization – of children AND adults …
        Na’ama

        Liked by 1 person

  23. A great picture of the refined creativity of casual cruelty

    Liked by 3 people

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