Inside the Mind of Isadora

Friday Fictioneers – The American Dream

49 Comments

Tears flowed faster than Esmeralda could wipe them away. She was inconsolable. Five years of waiting was all for nothing. The dreams of a better life negated by a virus.

Pedro was fortunate to have found a job as a dishwasher at MaMa’s pizzeria when he arrived in America. Leaving his family behind was a high price paid but worth it. It meant a better life for his family. Drug cartels were taking over his town. Random shootings with crime rampant too edged him on for a better way of living. 

The landlord trashing his life onto the sidewalk: Defeated!

2020Β©Isadora De La Vega

Genre: Flash Fiction

Word Count: 100

Photo Prompt: Roger Bultot

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Be Safe … Isadora 😎

Author: Inside the Mind of Isadora

Intriguing, sensitive, mysterious, loving, artistic and crackling with excitement for life is a pretty good description of who I am. I just retired from the world of art where I sold my Artfully Designed Handmade Jewelry for 28 years; although, art will always be a part of whom I am no matter what venue I choose to express it.

49 thoughts on “Friday Fictioneers – The American Dream

  1. Grass is greener. Good piece.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. The grass is always greener. Ouch dreams crushed, a harsh reality.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Sad but topical story. The virus is not just impacting people’s health it’s also affecting their livelihood.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It sure is impacting everyone. My hubby and I are artists. Both of our work has diminished.
      Our on-line business, because art shows have been canceled, is building but very, very slowly.
      Let’s hope this virus ends soon. Thank you for commenting. Have a great day … Be Safe
      Isadora 😎

      Like

  4. A sad story with a lot of truth. You wrote it well, Isadora.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Too true, Isadora. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. A very sad story and like so many during this time I’m sure. Nicely written reminder, Isadora! Take care!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. You’ve told this story with great sensitivity, Isadora. Largely being in isolation, I’m losing touch with the outside world. Don’t know what’s going on out there. The news only shows so much. The spread of the virus has been very curtailed here in Australia, but that has taken effort and restrictions. I’ve been happy to make the short-term sacrifice to keep safe. We have been lucky in a sense that my husband has kept his job, although he also chooses a more secure and less unstable job, but not everyone has that choice and. It’s tough out there.
    I have read stories about evictions during the depression of the 1930s in Sydney. The family would be evicted and the mum and kids would find somewhere to stay and Dad would sleep out on the street with their furniture to keep it safe. How awful is that!!
    The interesting thing is that many are actually better off, including our family. Many, including my husband, are working from home and saving money on transport, lunches and incidentals. Some people have caught the virus and been sick and died. Meanwhile, here in Australia measures to reduce the spread of covid, really reduced the incidence of flu this season in Australia. So, there are probably many lives which have been saved as a byproduct of covid. To put it simply, there are winners and losers in this. Moreover, the winners need to do their bit to help people bearing the brunt of all of this. Just because you got a free pass, doesn’t mean you should get away scott free.
    Clearly, we are living in very complicated times and it doesn’t look like things are going to resolve vaccine while t least until next year at the earliest.
    Hope you and yours stay safe and that vaccine comes along pronto.
    Best wishes,
    Rowena

    Liked by 1 person

    • One can’t help but feel for those less fortunate than us who have lost a great deal of their life’s situation to this virus. Sure, everyone should have an emergency fund but if you’re making minimum wage or barely making it, how can one save? I have a friend who volunteers at a food pantry. She is heartbroken by the many families who are embarrassed to have to ask for help since they were hard working people before they lost their jobs. It’s a difficult time for us all. Isolation causes a lack of interaction with family and friends. There’s a feeling of loss that’s difficult to understand. I’m continuing to have hope in my fellow man. I think we will come out stronger and better people.
      Thank you for visiting , Rowena, and leaving such an interesting comment. I appreciate all who come to my little place of peace.
      Have a wonderful weekend filled with the joy of being alive and healthy.
      Isadora 😎

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks, Isadora. I appreciate your kind heart and sensitivity to the troubles of those around you. It’s something which is also important to me. Things aren’t too bad where I live and I’ve come across a few homeless people but they pre-date covid. I’ve seen people interviewed on TV where families hva been able to stretch things out with the landlord for 6 months but time’s up and in some instances, the landlord has also lost their job. A friend of mine used to work for a homeless shelter and they said most of us are a paypacket away from being out on the street. That most people don’t have a buffer. While you’d think people on bigger salaries would be more protected, that’s not always the case either when they just spend more.
        You might like to check out the walk i took this week. I went out in search of a beautiful red Australian flower called the Waratah. I’d never seen one on the wild before and friends told me they were just beside the road and I was in luck. One look at that would cheer anybody up.
        Best wishes,
        Rowena

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Pretty much sums up the present state of affairs, Dora.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. This damned virus us killing many dreams.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. hope’s not lost. didn’t trump say the virus will be over soon?

    Liked by 1 person

  11. A sad state of affairs. Just how many have found themselves on the street because of all this?

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m sure there’s many, many who are lost. Waitresses, dishwashes, restuarant owners and so on. It’s been a tough climb for those in service jobs. What will the futrue bring? Let’s hope better days. Thanks, Dale. Have a great weekend … Be Safe
      Isadora 😎

      Liked by 1 person

      • Tell me about it. I’m in the service industry and lost my job but was lucky a friend needed someone at he golf club.
        You, too!

        Liked by 1 person

        • YUP … my granddaughter worked for one of the big meat type restaurants (ok Longhorns) as a waitress. With two small toddlers it was a hardship to be layed off. They called her back but with shorter hours. I hope your job comes back or that your friend keeps you working at his golf club. Without an income, it feels desperate. My hubby isn’t able to do his art shows so we’ve tightened our belts. ARt is that last thing people are buying during these times. Although, he’s been doing well on his web-site he misses the interaction with his customers. I feel like I want to do a Taino Indian Dance (my great grandmother was an indian and those before her).With my luck it would turn out as a snow dance in Florida. LOLOL Ya’ gotta laugh – like they say in Brooklyn. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜πŸ˜Ž

          Liked by 2 people

  12. Such a heartbreaking story and sadly a reality for many.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Querida Isadora,

    Es una cuenta muy triste y demasiado verdad. Bien escrito mi amiga. Estoy llorando para me paΓ­s y el mundo.

    Shalom y cariΓ±o,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    • Querida Rochelle,
      Yes, it’s a story of our tragic times. I went with the first thing that came to mind. My dear friend works at a soup kitchen / food pantry. She’s told me how sad it is to see people with babies or children coming in and needing some food. This is America … what is happening to us? Si, es tan triste que uno solo quiere llorar. Gracias, mi amiga por sus buenas palabras. Be Safe …
      Abrazos y Carino,
      Isadora 😎 πŸ’œ

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Just one of many tragic consequences of this awful virus. Will it ever end?

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I just made a comment about evictions despite a moratorium on them on Adele’s blog. NPR had a story about it today. Just so heartbreaking to kick someone when they are in a vulnerable state 😦

    Liked by 1 person

    • Unfortunately, landlords , at times, can be rigid when it comes to paying your rent. I think that even with a moratorium, if the landlord wants you out you’re out. Many, many who have suffered like this story will find it difficult to climb up again. Let’s keep hope in our hearts that all will be good again one day. Thanks, Jade. I appreciate the visit and comment. Have a great day … Be Safe
      Isadora 😎

      Liked by 1 person

  16. The virus has taken it’s toll on a lot of dreams and employment already. A story for our times.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. What a tragic end, Isadora! Lives are being torn apart like this every day. May we have the eyes to see and the hands to help.

    Liked by 1 person

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