Inside the Mind of Isadora

Friday Fictioneers – Trash or Treasure

68 Comments

On Hayward Street, everyone walked on the opposite street when passing ‘The Seidel’s’.

Wille lived there with his mother. He had mental and physical abnormalities. His head would tilt just so as he dragged his club foot and balanced his deformed hand on his chest.

Mrs. Seidel would raise her fist and yell at the boys who’d tease him. Everyone wondered where he’d go if something happened to her.

In time, he was taken to a psychiatric facility; his mother taken to a senior home.

The estate sale showcased unusual antiques.

Who knew old oil cans could be so valuable.

2018©Isadora DeLaVega

Genre: Flash Fiction

Word Count: 100 

Photo Prompt:Nick Allen

To join Rochelle and her Friday Fictioneers

 in this challenge click here

Author: Inside the Mind of Isadora

Intriguing, sensitive, mysterious, loving, artistic and crackling with excitement for life is a pretty good description of who I am. I just retired from the world of art where I sold my Artfully Designed Handmade Jewelry for 28 years; although, art will always be a part of whom I am no matter what venue I choose to express it.

68 thoughts on “Friday Fictioneers – Trash or Treasure

  1. Poor Willie, carted off like that! I am glad I don’t live on that street! I bet the home his mum went to took the proceeds to pay for her care! Thank you for shining a light on their plight. 🙂

    Like

  2. I have some aging friends with a disabled daughter. They have money put aside to see that she’s well cared for, but still it’s heartbreaking. This was a well written piece. Let’s hope they get the full value from the antiques.

    Like

  3. Interesting look at a sad life.

    Like

  4. sad story, but it happens.

    Like

  5. Such a sad life… I just hope the oil can could bring some improvements to the them in their new homes…

    Like

  6. I found your tale so poignant – if only they’d known those oil cans were worth something perhaps they could have stayed together. Such a difficult time when a parent can no longer care for their disabled child. Your description of the child was vivid.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. This is an inviting story, it promises so much. Wonderful that you are expanding the story, Isadora. Best of wishes, Jilly.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. It is a fear of the unknown and “not normal” that keeps people away. Such a sad reality.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I’m glad to hear you are fleshing out this scenario, the characters have a lot of promise.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Sounds like an interesting book. The shame and ridicule that often accompanied disability in the past (not helped much by disproven pseudo-science) has caused many to live in the shadows in isolation like this.
    I hope that now the world has become more willing to accept and welcome such differences, and allow the disabled to thrive in their own communities, rather than shutting them away or forcing parents to be their adult children’s sole provider and source of comfort.
    To me, a parent of a child with autism, this scenario, though likely not uncommon still, seems obscene.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Querida Isadora,

    I’m intrigued to find you’re writing a book. I look forward to reading it. As it is, there’s a lot of story packed into this little snippet and I’m sure there is so much more. Bien escrito mi amiga.

    Shalom y abrazos,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Hmmmm.
    Wonder if that will be their epitaph too!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Did some of the proceeds from estate sale go to Wille and Mrs. Seidel? Their physical existence will be little less painful.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. A sad tale of a difficult life. I hope there is something good in the end. Well-written!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. So very sad but a wonderful story!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. This is very, very sad

    Liked by 1 person

  17. A sorrowful tale with a ray of hope in the final few words.

    Click to read my FriFic tale!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Just each other and then separation, very sad.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. What a heartbreaking tale. It is a pity they were ostracized by the townspeople.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Perfect ending. I just hope they aren’t robbed of their money, that they have someone to stand for them.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Hopefully the proceeds would go to make the lives of both mom and son more comfortable, even in the ‘homes’ they have been sent to.
    This reminds me of a true story I’d seen in the news some years ago, about an estate left by a loner (who perhaps had some form of mild Autism or similar issues, from the description others had of him). He’d kept everything in his parents home (which he continued to live in) as it had been while they lived, and many of the items proved to be quite valuable. I remember wondering who benefited from that estate sale, as I didn’t think he’d have left a will. But who knows?!
    Nicely done, Isadora!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. I wonder who the narrator is, if she or he will be in charge of the proceeds, if said earnings will go towards the The Seidel’s expenses, if the loss of the collections will break the collector’s heart…

    The last line is so sad. The detachment heartbreaking.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. The real pity is that they were probably interesting people and potentially good friends if anyone had bothered to get to know them.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. I hope they get a mint for them. Sad, but well done take.

    Like

  25. I hope they got the proceeds of the sale

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Communities can be cruel like that. Well written.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Poor Willie – and poor mum. Sad little story – but hopefully they profited from the sale.

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for your thoughts, Susan. It’s part of a chapter in a book I’m writing. Glad you left a comment.
      Isadora 😎
      ps: I commented on your post on Wednesday. I have trouble leaving comments. Sometimes, there are many sign in steps yet at the end their not accepted. I’m going to pop over and see if mine posted. Otherwise I’ll try again. : (

      Like

I'd Love to hear what you think. Thanks ...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.